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Inequality-The-IFS-Deaton-Review

Our goal at the Institute for Fiscal Studies is to promote effective economic and social policies by better understanding how policies affect individuals, families, businesses and the government's finances.
Rishi Sunak
The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rishi Sunak, has announced that the government will publish the Budget on Wednesday 3 March 2021. Before, on and after that date, we will be producing rigorous, independent analysis of the choices facing the Chancellor.
NHS website
This report examines the effect that variation in the cost of living has on the labour supply of existing nurses in NHS acute trusts. We focus on Band 5 and 6 nurses. These accounted for 23% of the workforce in NHS acute trusts in 2018.
UK road
In this episode, Paul speaks with IFS Deputy Directors, Carl Emmerson and Helen Miller to explore the immediate decisions facing the Chancellor in the upcoming Spring Budget.
Nurse talking to a patient in a hospital
Pay is an important lever in attracting and keeping staff, but is subject to tight regulations within the NHS. At this event, we will present new IFS work looking at the flexibility of the current pay system and its ability to address differences in the local cost of living across the country.

Rishi Sunak

IFS Zooms in podcast

Covid 19 and the economy

Events

Upcoming event
Date 04 March 2021 | 10:00 - 11:30
Location Online only
Availablity Places available
The Spring 2021 Budget will be the first one since the UK entered a series of lockdowns and Great Britain left the EU's Single Market and Customs Union. IFS researchers will present their initial analysis of the Chancellor's announcements on the public finances, spending on public services, and the tax and the benefit system on the following day, Thursday 4 March, at an online briefing.

Older articles

This report analyses how these differences in school reopenings affected the learning experiences of English school children. To examine this, we leverage a unique panel of data, allowing us to observe how learning changed between April/May and June/July for around 650 school-aged children in England.
'Hancock is just the latest in a very long line to grasp for that illusion of control. One day, probably in a decade or so, one of his successors will be so burnt by the experience of attempting to achieve the impossible that another re-disorganisation will be visited upon a system still doing its best to deliver that healthcare to us all.' Paul Johnson in The Times.
At this public briefing ahead of the forthcoming Budget, IFS researchers will set out their latest assessment of the economic and fiscal backdrop and some of the key policy decisions that the Chancellor will need to take.
What can policymakers do to make up for lost learning? Here to discuss are Luke Sibieta, IFS Research Fellow, and Becky Francis, CEO of the Education Endowment Foundation, an independent charity which seeks to improve the educational attainment of the poorest pupils in English schools.
In this briefing note, we update and extend previous IFS analysis, to consider how employment, incomes, benefit claims and council tax payments have evolved over a longer period and have varied geographically, and draw out key implications for local government.
By the time the pandemic is over, most children across the UK will have missed over half a year of normal, in person schooling. This observation sets out the economic case for a massive national plan to address this crisis.