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Journals

Our staff and associates contribute papers to leading academic journals.

Journal: all content

Showing 61 – 80 of 2837 results

Fiscal Studies cover

The decline of home-cooked food

Journal article

We show that observed behaviour can be rationalised by the fact that the shadow price of home-cooked food, which accounts for the fact that cooking takes time, has risen relative to the price of ready-to-eat food.

20 June 2022

Fiscal Studies cover

Who does and doesn't pay taxes?

Journal article

We use administrative tax data from audits of self-assessment tax returns to understand what types individuals are most likely to be non-compliant.

22 March 2022

The Economic Journal

Price floors and externality correction

Journal article

We evaluate the impact of a price floor for alcohol introduced in Scotland in 2018, using a difference-in-differences strategy with England as a contr

31 January 2022

Fiscal Studies cover

Behavioural responses to a wealth tax

Journal article

In this paper, we review the existing empirical evidence on how individuals respond to the incentives created by a net wealth tax.

25 October 2021

Fiscal Studies cover

Revenue and distributional modelling for a UK wealth tax

Journal article

In this paper, we model the revenue that could be raised from an annual and a one-off wealth tax of the design recommended by Advani, Chamberlain and Summers in the Wealth Tax Commission's Final Report (2020).

25 October 2021

Journal graphic

Life expectancy inequalities in Hungary over 25 years: The role of avoidable deaths

Journal article

Using mortality registers and administrative data on income and population, we develop new evidence on the magnitude of life expectancy inequality in Hungary and the scope for health policy in mitigating this. We document considerable inequalities in life expectancy at age 45 across settlement-level income groups, and show that these inequalities have increased between 1991–96 and 2011–16 for both men and women. We show that avoidable deaths play a large role in life expectancy inequality. Income-related inequalities in health behaviours, access to care, and healthcare use are all closely linked to the inequality in life expectancy.

7 October 2021