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Creating equal opportunities for all: intergenerational mobility in England

Presentation

A socially mobile country provides equal opportunities for everyone, across big cities and small towns, and regardless of whether your parents are rich or poor. This event looked at the state of mobility across England and explored policy options for any government committed to a levelling up agenda.

It discussed the findings of recent IFS research which uses linked data on over half a million children to show how earnings outcomes of children from different backgrounds vary across the country, and explored the role of education and the labour market in creating opportunities for all.

Following a presentation on the recent research, there was a discussion from a group of panellists including:

  • Anne-Marie Canning, CEO of The Brilliant Club
  • Lee Elliot Major, Professor of Social Mobility at the University of Exeter
  • Liz Williams, Social Mobility Commissioner and CEO of FutureDotNow

You can watch the event in full below, or download the slides here.

Deaton inequality website

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