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UK firm accounts matched to US patents

Rachel Griffith and Rupert Harrison
Dataset

This page gives information on the match between Datastream company accounts data and the NBER US Patents data.

This file contains the match between the Datastream 'dscode' and the 'assignee' code in the NBER data. Each 'dscode' may link to more than one 'assignee' code, since patent assignees may be subsidiaries of the firms listed in Datastream. The file is in CSV format.

Full document / more information [Zip file 9 KB]

For further details of the sample and matching procedure see:

Bloom, Nick, and John Van Reenen (2002), 'Patents, real options and firm performance', The Economic Journal 112, 478, pp. C97-C116

Please cite this paper as the source of the data.

Other papers using this data and derived datasets

Aghion, Philippe, Nick Bloom, Richard Blundell, Rachel Griffith and Peter Howitt (2005), Competition and innovation: an inverted U relationship, Quarterly Journal of Economics May 2005, Vol. 120, No. 2, pp. 701-728.

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Griffith, Rachel, Rupert Harrison and John Van Reenen (2006), How special is the special relationship? Using the impact of US R&D spillovers on UK firms as a test of technology sourcing, American Economic Review, December 2006

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