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Monica Costa Dias

Monica Costa Dias

Deputy Research Director

Education

PhD Economics, University College London, 2002
MA Economics (17/20), New University of Lisbon, 1997
BA Applied Mathematics to Economics and Management (17/20), Technical University of Lisbon, 1995

Monica is an Associate Director at the IFS and a Research Economist at the Centre for Economics and Finance, University of Porto. Her research interests are mainly on Labour Economics and the Economics of Education, with a focus on the determinants of individual and household choices, including human capital investments, labour supply and intra-household allocation of resources, and their consequences for inequality and the evaluation and design of tax and welfare policies

Academic outputs

Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 3
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to ...
IFS Working Paper W20/26
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID-19 lockdown with pre-lockdown data from the UK Time User Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown.

Reports and comment

Briefing note
The large decline in women’s paid work after childbirth cannot, in general, be explained by couples prioritising the paid work of the higher-wage parent. Put most simply, this is because women are always more likely to stop working after parenthood, regardless of whether or not they were the ...
Report
The COVID-19 school closures forced children and parents to make unprecedented changes to their daily routines. Including the summer holidays, most children will have had a five-and-a-half-month break from physically attending school by the time they returned in September.

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was delivered to officials from the Government Equalities Office in London on 23rd April 2018.
Presentation
This presentation was given at the American Economics Association (AEA) and Allied Social Scientice Associations (ASSA) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.
( 88 results found )
Press release
The different roles played by men and women upon becoming parents, with respect to paid work and childcare, are a crucial part of the development of gender pay gaps. New analysis shows that this divide occurs even when the mother had the higher wage in the household pre-childbirth – as is the ...
Briefing note
The large decline in women’s paid work after childbirth cannot, in general, be explained by couples prioritising the paid work of the higher-wage parent. Put most simply, this is because women are always more likely to stop working after parenthood, regardless of whether or not they were the ...
Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 3
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to ...
Report
The COVID-19 school closures forced children and parents to make unprecedented changes to their daily routines. Including the summer holidays, most children will have had a five-and-a-half-month break from physically attending school by the time they returned in September.
Observation
In this observation, we use data from an online survey of parents with school-aged children – funded by the Nuffield Foundation and collected during June and July 2020 – to document the patchwork of in-person schooling that children had before the summer. We also explore parents’ concerns ...
Observation
Prior to the crisis there was no gap in the average amount of time spent learning between children from better and worse off families, but during the lockdown a sizeable gap emerged.
IFS Working Paper W20/26
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID-19 lockdown with pre-lockdown data from the UK Time User Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown.
Briefing note
Interest in the issue of career progression has been growing, fuelled by a decade of stagnant productivity and pay growth (even before the COVID-19 crisis) and concerns that changes in the labour market – such as the casualisation of work in the gig economy – are making it harder for some ...
Press release
High-skill high-paid occupations are much more prevalent in the UK economy than in the past, but young people have defied this trend.
Journal article
COVID-19 has uprooted many aspects of parents’ daily routines, from their jobs to their childcare arrangements.