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Ellen Greaves

Ellen Greaves

Research Associate

Education

MSc Economics (Distinction), University College London, 2012

BSc Economics and Mathematics (1st Class), University of Bristol, 2007

Ellen joined the IFS in 2009 as a Research Economist in the Education, Employment and Evaluation sector, and she became a Senior Research Economist in 2014.  Ellen's research focuses on pupil well-being and attainment, including the impact of a pupil's month of birth and parents' marital status on these outcomes. She has also contributed to a number of large-scale policy evaluations, including the impact of the provision of universal free school meals and an early intervention literacy programme, and is currently leading the evaluation of the Achieve Together pilot. Related to schools and teachers, Ellen has investigated whether parents' preferences for primary schools mean that school choice and competition can help improve academic standards in schools, and is currently leading research into the costs and benefits of different initial teacher training routes.

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W17/11
There is substantial evidence of a significant relationship between parents’ income and sons’ earnings in the UK, and that this relationship has strengthened over time. We extend this by exploring a broader measure of net family income as an outcome.
Journal article
This paper finds differences in the age at which cognitive skills are tested accounts for the vast majority of the difference in outcomes between children who are born at different times of the year.

Reports and comment

Observation
Recent IFS work shows that students from disadvantaged backgrounds see some of the largest financial benefits from going on to university. But these students are also less likely to attend university than their better-off peers who get exactly the same grades as them. And, even among students with ...
Report
While there is broad agreement in the UK on the importance of social mobility, current evidence suggests that social background is more strongly related to outcomes in the UK than in many other developed countries.

Presentations

Presentation
Presentation given at the European Economic Association conference, 22 August 2017.
Presentation
This presentation was given by Christine Farquharson at the 2017 Royal Economic Society Conference on 10 April 2017.
( 76 results found )
Report
While there is broad agreement in the UK on the importance of social mobility, current evidence suggests that social background is more strongly related to outcomes in the UK than in many other developed countries.
Observation
Recent IFS work shows that students from disadvantaged backgrounds see some of the largest financial benefits from going on to university. But these students are also less likely to attend university than their better-off peers who get exactly the same grades as them. And, even among students with ...
Report
The Government has introduced substantial reforms to the pay of teachers in the English local authority (LA) maintained sector, to give schools greater freedom to decide how much they pay teachers and how quickly their pay progresses. This study set out to identify what reforms schools were making, ...
Presentation
Presentation given at the European Economic Association conference, 22 August 2017.
Press release
Chris Belfield, Claire Crawford, Ellen Greaves, Paul Gregg and Lindsey Macmillan
There is substantial evidence of a significant relationship between parents’ income and sons’ earnings in the UK, and that this relationship has strengthened over time. We extend this by exploring a broader measure of net family income as an outcome.
IFS Working Paper W17/11
Chris Belfield, Claire Crawford, Ellen Greaves, Paul Gregg and Lindsey Macmillan
There is substantial evidence of a significant relationship between parents’ income and sons’ earnings in the UK, and that this relationship has strengthened over time. We extend this by exploring a broader measure of net family income as an outcome.
Presentation
This presentation was given by Christine Farquharson at the 2017 Royal Economic Society Conference on 10 April 2017.
Press release
Neil Amin Smith, Ellen Greaves and Luke Sibieta
During the Great Recession, public sector pay increased relative to that of private sector workers. The gap in pay between public and private sector workers has since fallen back to pre-crisis levels as the pay and pensions of public sector workers have been squeezed since 2010. Nevertheless, in ...
External publication
Neil Amin Smith, Ellen Greaves and Luke Sibieta
Public sector pay has been squeezed since public spending cuts began to take effect from 2011, and it looks set to be squeezed even further up to 2020. However, this comes on the back of an increase in public sector wages relative to those in the private sector during the Great Recession. There is ...
Observation
New IFS research finds that providing school breakfasts free to all children in disadvantaged English primary schools helps pupils to make two months’ additional progress over the course of a year. These gains seem to be driven by better behaviour and concentration in the classroom, meaning that ...