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Christine Farquharson

Christine Farquharson

Senior Research Economist

Education

MSc Economics, London School of Economics, 2015

B.A. (Hons) Economics, University of Toronto, 2014

Christine joined the IFS in 2015 in the Education and Skills sector. Her work focuses on early intervention, child development, and programme evaluation. Current projects include assessing the impact Sure Start has on children’s health outcomes, piloting an early intervention programme in Peterborough, and modelling the relationship between parental labour supply, childcare choices, and child development. Since 2018, Christine has also been an editor of the IFS Green Budget, which sets out the challenges and trade-offs facing the Chancellor in advance of the Budget each year.

Reports

Report
While there is broad agreement in the UK on the importance of social mobility, current evidence suggests that social background is more strongly related to outcomes in the UK than in many other developed countries.
Briefing note
This briefing note describes the range and level of COVID-related spending on education in England.

News and comment

Observation
Recent IFS work shows that students from disadvantaged backgrounds see some of the largest financial benefits from going on to university. But these students are also less likely to attend university than their better-off peers who get exactly the same grades as them. And, even among students with ...
Observation
Scottish Labour set out a vision for big expansion of the welfare state - with no sense of how much this would eventually cost or how it would be paid for

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given by Christine Farquharson at the 2019 General Election manifesto analysis briefing.
Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.