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Richard Blundell

Richard Blundell

Director of CPP

Richard is Director of the ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP) at IFS. He holds the David Ricardo Chair of Political Economy at University College London. A graduate of the University of Bristol and London School of Economics. From 1986 until 2016 he was Research Director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS). He has held visiting professor positions at UBC, MIT and Berkeley. He holds Honorary Doctorates from the University of St.Gallen, Switzerland; the Norwegian School of Economics, NHH, Bergen, Norway; the University of Mannheim, Mannheim; the University of Bristol; and the and the University of Venice Ca’Foscari. He was awarded a CBE in the Queen's New Year's Honours List 2006 and a Knighthood in 2014 for services to Economics and Social Science.
 
In 1995 he was awarded the Yrjö Jahnsson Prize for his work in microeconometrics and the analysis of labour supply, welfare reform and consumer behaviour. In 2000 he was awarded the Econometric Society Frisch Prize Medal for his paper 'Estimating Labour Supply Responses using Tax Reforms'. In 2008 he was the recipient of the Jean-Jacques Laffont Prize given to a high level economist whose research combines both the theoretical and applied aspects of economics.  He was awarded the CES-Ifo Prize in 2010 and the Sandmo Prize in 2011. He was recipient of the IZA Prize in Labor Economics in 2012. He was awarded the 2015 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Prize in Economics. In 2017, he received the Nemmers Prize in Economics.
 
In 2004 he was President of the European Economics Association. He was President of the Econometric Society in 2006. He was President of the Society of Labor Economics in 2010. He was President of the Royal Economic Society 2011-2013. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, Fellow of the British Academy, Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and Honorary Member American Academy of Arts and Science.
 
His research covers the empirical microeconomic study of consumer, savings and labour supply behaviour. He has studied the relationship between taxation, family labour supply and consumer behavior. He has developed new microeconometric tools for the study of dynamic panel data models and the nonparametric analysis of individual decisions. His published papers have appeared in Econometrica, Review of Economic Studies, American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Journal of Econometrics, and other top journals. He has been on the editorial board of many academic journals and was editor of the Journal of Econometrics from 1992 to 1997, and co-editor of Econometrica 1997-2001. He is currently an Editorial Board member of Annual Reviews and a founder editor of Microeconomic Insights. He has worked on a number of high profile policy reports most especially on personal tax reform, pension reform and the analysis of inequality.  He was an editor and author of the Mirrlees Review of Tax Reform which reported its findings in 2011. His collected work on Taxation and Labour Supply is published by Oxford University Press in March 2016.

Journal articles

Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 2
This paper brings together evidence from various data sources and the most recent studies to describe what we know so far about the impacts of the COVID‐19 crisis on inequalities across several key domains of life, including employment and ability to earn, family life and health.
Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 2
This paper discusses problems in interpreting the CPI as a measure of how the cost of living is changing during the lockdown.

Working papers

IFS Working Paper W20/28
Roughly one third of a cohort drop out of high school across OECD countries, and developing effective tools to address prime-aged high school dropouts is a key policy question.
IFS Working Paper W20/11
We examine changes in inequality in socio-emotional skills very early in life in two British cohorts born 30 years apart.

Presentations

Presentation
This is the first in a series of online events looking in detail at the three major economic challenges identified by the Tirole-Blanchard Commission, featuring presentations by Stefanie Stantcheva and Dani Rodrik.
Presentation
Presentation on 'Inequalities in education, skills, and incomes: Implications of the COVID-19 pandemic,' for the EEA-ESEM Invited Session “Inequality Was Bad – Will the Pandemic Make it Worse?”.
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Presentation
This is the first in a series of online events looking in detail at the three major economic challenges identified by the Tirole-Blanchard Commission, featuring presentations by Stefanie Stantcheva and Dani Rodrik.
Presentation
Presentation on 'Inequalities in education, skills, and incomes: Implications of the COVID-19 pandemic,' for the EEA-ESEM Invited Session “Inequality Was Bad – Will the Pandemic Make it Worse?”.
Presentation
Olivier Blanchard, Jean Tirole, Richard Blundell, Carol Propper and Nick Stern
At this IFS event, Olivier Blanchard, Professor Emeritus at MIT and former Chief Economist at the IMF, and Jean Tirole, Nobel Prize-winner and Honorary President of the Toulouse School of Economics, presented their report on the major future economic challenges.
Briefing note
This report seeks to set out the potential effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on inequalities in the UK. The pandemic has affected inequalities in education, training, wages, employment and health, including how these vary by gender, ethnicity, and across generations.
IFS Working Paper W20/28
Patrick Bennett, Richard Blundell and Kjell G. Salvanes
Roughly one third of a cohort drop out of high school across OECD countries, and developing effective tools to address prime-aged high school dropouts is a key policy question.
Briefing note
Interest in the issue of career progression has been growing, fuelled by a decade of stagnant productivity and pay growth (even before the COVID-19 crisis) and concerns that changes in the labour market – such as the casualisation of work in the gig economy – are making it harder for some ...
Press release
High-skill high-paid occupations are much more prevalent in the UK economy than in the past, but young people have defied this trend.
Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 2
This paper brings together evidence from various data sources and the most recent studies to describe what we know so far about the impacts of the COVID‐19 crisis on inequalities across several key domains of life, including employment and ability to earn, family life and health.
Press release
The government needs to carefully consider whether and how to stimulate the economy after the coronavirus crisis.
Briefing note
Reports indicate the government is considering a temporary cut in VAT to stimulate consumer demand, possibly targeted at sectors such as tourism and restaurants. Overall the case for a temporary VAT cut now is mixed. It could provide an important fillip to consumer demand if implemented under the ...